Battle of Givenchy Centenary Tour Saturday 7th – Wednesday 11th April 2018

‘… the atmosphere that was created was very moving’ – comment by a year 9 pupil after a trip to the Somme, July 2016

55 Rose

 

The Hundredth Anniversary of the first day of the Battle of Givenchy – when the 55th (West Lancashire) Division fought off a massive German attack – will occur on 9th April 2018. It will be a good moment to visit the ground upon which so many soldiers from the North-West of England fought and are commemorated.

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We will explore the landscape by either minibus or small coach (depending upon numbers) and on foot, takingĀ in remnants of the battlefield and the many associated memorials and cemeteries. Real soldiers’ stories will be woven into our visits, giving many opportunities for discussion, reflection and commemoration. Continue reading

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Thomas Ernest De Maine of Morecambe

Thomas’s name appears on the Morecambe War Memorial. The first source to mention his existence is the 1901 census:

Demaine Family on King Street, Morecambe in 1901

Demaine Family on King Street, Morecambe in 1901

We see that Thomas’s parents were Henry and Mary De Maine and that Thomas had a brother called John McClure Demaine who was born in about 1893. The next source is the 1911 census: Continue reading

Private Farrell G. Dixon of Morecambe

Private Dixon appears on Morecambe War Memorial and was mentioned in the ‘Lancaster Guardian’ of 25th March 1916 as follows:

Farrell Dixon 'Lancaster Guardian' 25th March 1916

‘Lancaster Guardian’ 25th March 1916

The article is typical of the time and gives us a brief, but useful introduction to the experiences of one Morecambe family during the Great War. We notice the following facts:

  • In 1916, the Dixon family lived at 65 Edward Street, Morecambe.
  • Farrell was serving with the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment.
  • He was killed in action ‘in France’ on 2nd March 1916 aged 24.
  • He went to France at the beginning of the summer of 1915.
  • He had been on leave a month prior to his death.
  • Farrell’s father, George, served in the Royal Army Medical Corps.
  • His brother, Leonard, was an ‘Old Territorial’, who was also on active service and had been seriously wounded in the left arm.
  • His brother, George Frederick, was a sergeant in the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, also on active service.

Continue reading